Threatpoint is definitely a band of metal heads, for metal heads: and I had a chance to interview them. Their music is all about riffs and double bass pedals. However, they have a unique twist: their music has “a positive and spiritual side”.

During our conversation, we were able to talk about several interesting topics, including their new album Salvation and some of their influences.

If you’re like me and want to follow this group, you can them on Facebook, YouTube, Spotify and Instagram @threatpointofficial

 

  • What are your biggest musical influences?

Definitely old school thrash metal, that’s what unites us as band members. We all are into various thrash metal bands from the 80s 90s and even currently.

 

  • Do you listen to any band or genre that would surprise your fans if they found out?

Yes…Michael Bublé, Dean Martin, Bee Gees, Johnny Cash, 80s pop, country music, jazz, classical…the list goes on. None of us lock into one genre.

 

  • What’s next for the band?

Releasing our new album Salvation on February 22,2019, then getting out to push the album and show off the new songs live.

 

  • How do you think streaming services like Spotify and Pandora have changed how bands release music? Has it made it easier or more difficult?

There’s good and bad in it, stealing music hurts all of us, there are big bills that come with playing in a band, and stealing music steals from our way to pay for these expenses. Flip side is music gets out there faster and easier, if everyone paid for it, it would be much easier for all of us.

 

  • Do you have any non-musical influences that show up in your music?

We just watch the world go by as everyone. There is lots of influence in that alone.

 

  • Can you describe your sound?

We are definitely thrashy with lots of groove. We do have a hard rock element to it and also mix in other types of metal styles throughout our sound. But we are energetic and positive.

 

  • What are you listening to lately? Anything you would recommend?

We all listen to different bands outside. Yeah, I’d like to recommend Sonic Prophecy out of Utah. Their newest Cd “Savage Gods” is pretty awesome. We got to play with them once out on a west coast run, they are fabulous!

 

  • What made you decide to “get into” music and start a band?

We all grew up with music all around us. Our family members listening to music and taking us to concerts. I guess it just gets in your blood and becomes part of your everyday life, like golfing or fishing or skiing for other people. We started Threatpoint because we all came from broken bands and had no desire to give up …

 

  • How does your writing process work, do you all collaborate on the lyrics or is that job reserved for just one person?

Musically, Alex and Chris come up with riffs on their own and bring them into practice to work them out. Sometimes it just happens in the practice room on the spot. CJ may start with a cool beat and the rest is history. The next album will also have Sam on Bass and Greg also writing on guitar, so we definitely expanded our writing section. Lyrics come from Chris. He writes all the lyrics. Some are stories from people we’ve met along the way, some come from the news on TV. But they all have a positive and spiritual side to them. Nothing is fairy tale and make believe, pretty much everyday life…

 

  • If you had to pick just one, which album would be your favorite?

The new one coming out “Salvation” it’s a return to childhood thrash metal and classic bands we grew up influenced on.

 

  • Are there any bands you would desperately love to tour with someday?

Oh sure wouldn’t we all. Any of the favorites we all had as kids…

 

  • What are your thoughts about bands releasing more singles, rather than following a traditional route and just releasing albums?

I think it’s because people nowadays make playlists to listen to versus listening to full albums. I myself still am a full album guy. I like to hear the flow and the different songs of the whole thought process of a band. A single is like only reading one chapter of a book. You never get the full story.